GET ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT
magazine
Yes! Send me the FREE digital edition of Attractions Management and the FREE weekly Attractions Management ezines and breaking news alerts!
Not right now, thanksclose this window
POST YOUR JOB ONLINE
Free ezine/digital edition sign up
Jobs   News   Features   Video    Products   Company profilesProfiles   Magazine   Handbook   Advertise  
Profile
Terri Irwin

The conservationist, social entrepreneur and zoo operator describes how she’s continuing late husband Steve Irwin’s work, which includes opening an animal attraction in Las Vegas

By Jennifer Harbottle | Published in Attractions Management 2013 issue 3


For most people who suffer the bereavement of a partner, having to deal with their grief is hard enough. When Terri Irwin’s husband Steve died, she not only lost her soulmate, but also her business partner and the face behind their family brand.

Suddenly in charge of their business – Australia Zoo – Terri had to adapt quickly to her role as attractions operator, at the same time as being a single mum of two and honouring Steve’s legacy. It’s a task most would find overwhelming. “When Steve died, I was scared, not only by the deep level of grief I was feeling, but also how I was going to cope with everything from a personal and business point of view,” Terri recalls.

Seven years on, Terri’s the same gentle, committed and self-deprecating personality she was then. Australia Zoo is thriving and the many conservation projects Steve and Terri set up together to protect wildlife all over the world are still regular beneficiaries of money raised by the Irwin family business. Terri’s also still busy with filming commitments, only now it’s her children Bindi and Robert who are the stars.

Land Down Under
American-born Terri Irwin was based in Eugene, Oregon running a wildlife rehabilitation organisation before she moved to Australia to be with Steve. In 1992, when they married, Steve’s parents retired from their family-owned attraction called the Queensland Reptile and Fauna Park, where Steve was also working, and the newlyweds were put in charge. “We didn’t break even at the park for the first few years,” admits Terri, who says the pair was so broke they couldn’t afford to buy the business from Steve’s parents, agreeing to pay them a wage for life instead.

When they took over the ownership of the park, it was four-acres and employed two full-time staff. Even then, and despite the fact they had little money, Terri says Steve had big plans for it. “He saw it as an opportunity to showcase and help all of the wildlife he was so passionate about,” she explains.

A month into marriage, Steve and Terri began filming footage of themselves in the Australian outback wrestling snakes and crocodiles and discovering wild animals. At the same time, Terri sold her business in Oregon, which bankrolled the purchase of another four acres of land for the wildlife park, which Steve and Terri renamed Australia Zoo.

While Steve was talented with wildlife and consummately practical – “he was a fitter, a joiner and could even mill his own timber” – it was Terri who had the larger marketing perspective. “The first time I wanted to send out a press release, Steve told me it wasn’t how things were done,” she remembers. “But I loved working with Steve – he always challenged me. He was the one with the vision. I would tell him we didn’t have any money but he’d build it anyway.”

Television career
To afford Steve’s grand plans, Terri thought it’d be a good idea to approach a production company to sell them Steve’s documentaries. They’d been filming for three years by this point and had hours of footage. Terri cringes as she recalls sitting in the office of Discovery Channel in her eighties-suit with padded shoulders (“the only one I had”) and being told by the board of tv executives that nobody would watch a documentary where Steve was in shot so much. “They didn’t like what we showed them of Steve with the animals. They told us wildlife programmes weren’t filmed like that – they needed 80 per cent animals, 20 per cent presenter. In ours, Steve was in every shot.”

Serendipitously, a new wildlife channel for tv called Animal Planet was just starting up at the time and signed their documentary instead. By the time Steve died, his tv series The Crocodile Hunter had 80 million viewers worldwide.

All money earned from the tv work was ploughed back into Australia Zoo. Steve was determined to make it the biggest and best wildlife conservation facility in the world, which meant he had to work even harder on his documentaries. “Every time Steve had a dream for a new project, he’d do more filming in order to fund it.”

They created a management team to help run the zoo, including Steve’s best mate Wes Mannion, who is zoo director, and general manager Frank Muscillo, who’s married to Steve’s older sister. In 2004, the Irwins opened an Australian wildlife hospital next to the zoo to rehabilitate injured or endangered animals.

Planning ahead
Alongside funding and implementing new zoo exhibits, the Irwins began purchasing land in and around Queensland in order to preserve ecosystems in that part of Australia. On some of this land, they built animal rehabilitation and release facilities. At the time of his death, the media speculated that the Irwins had amassed a property portfolio estimated at AUD$20 million (US$19m, £12.2m, E14.3m).

Before Steve died, he’d put together a 10-year plan, which was his vision for wildlife conservation. Part of that involved making Terri promise she’d never let go of Australia Zoo or the family’s conservation properties if anything happened to him. At the zoo, his plan was to complete the half-finished South-East Asia area and build a new African open-range safari attraction, including the acquisition of some wildlife for both of these sections, which has now been achieved.

Another part of the 10-year plan was to develop an animal attraction in Las Vegas, similar to Australia Zoo. According to Terri, Steve wanted it to be a way of representing Australia in the US “Steve style”. Terri has the land options and the investors to go ahead with the project in Vegas, but is still negotiating with the various entities.

I ask if fulfilling Steve’s legacy and running a world-class attraction sometimes gets too much. “I’m lucky to earn a living doing what I love,” she replies. “I’ve never felt like packing it in and have always honoured Steve’s promise. I have good help – people who are better at this than I am. Plus, I’ve done everything in the business; I’ve cleaned cages, I’ve done the marketing, I know where the cabling is. It’s grown organically, so hasn’t been as daunting as if I’d come straight into this huge business. After Steve died, despite my grief and fear, I was always driven to make things better, not just keep them the same.”

Today, Australia Zoo is 100 acres and employs 400 staff and volunteers. Since she took over sole ownership of Australia Zoo, Terri has completed the South-East Asia section, opened an African safari exhibit and held onto all 80,000 acres of conservation properties. In 2008, she oversaw the building of a new Aus$5m (US$4.8m, £3m, E3.6m) Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital, which is the largest of its kind in Australia. The Hospital takes in more than 7,500 animals a year, and along with the conservation properties it funds worldwide, the zoo’s also the sole or majority benefactor of a number of wildlife charity projects globally.

Terri says the hospital alone costs Aus$2.5m (US$2.4m, £1.5m, E1.8m) a year to run. The facility is donation dependant, with Australia Zoo covering the deficit – In 2012, this was to the tune of $1.3m, after $700,000 was raised through public donations. “We’re social entrepreneurs – it’s what we want to do,” says Terri. “Our profit margin isn’t high, but we’re joyful every day.”

Tough conditions
Terri admits that running the business hasn’t always been easy. At the time of Steve’s death, Australia Zoo was growing at 60 per cent per year and getting almost one million visitors annually. After he died, there was an increase in numbers as well wishers came to the zoo, but since then, the business has been hit by the GFC and colossal rains in Queensland and now visitor numbers are more like 600,000 per annum.

To allow for the hit to the zoo, Terri has got rid of anything that isn’t fundamental to the business, including a whale-watching company and a travel agency. She admits the zoo’s growth path has slowed. “I run the company with the priority of animals first, staff second and visitors third. If the animals need something, that comes before anything else. If things get tough, we go on the skinny – we don’t can the project,” she explains. “I may not be able to give the tiger unit in Sumatra as much money for their anti-poaching activities, but I still give something and no one at the project loses their job.”

When Steve Irwin died, the zoo’s main brand ambassador went too. How do they cope without its main attraction? “Steve stood for so much. He always said he didn’t mind if he got remembered or not, just that his message did. We still use his pictures, he’s the embodiment of the ethics of the Irwin family and Australia Zoo.”

Now that Bindi is a tv star in her own right, (her show, Bindi’s Bootcamp, is set at the zoo and airs on Discovery Kids), Australia Zoo also has the income from her filming. This eases the burden financially, but Terri acknowledges that Steve was one of a kind. “No one is ever going to come close to him, so we still use him as a major brand of what we do. We couldn’t ever afford in terms of marketing the exposure he gives us and our projects. Right now, Steve’s in 500 million houses in 42 countries worldwide.”

An issue of scale
Terri believes that despite the benefit of the tv royalties, she faces the same issues as any other wildlife operator. “Zoos have a responsibility to be a caretaker, not just a showcase for animals,” she says. “A zoo can be a life-changing experience if you set it up and package it to the guests properly – if you can feel and smell and connect with an animal, it gets into your heart and touches you and you fall in love with it.”

Terri believes that all too often, visitors see sad animals and sad staff at animal attractions. “If visitors see pacing animals, they won’t come back. If you can’t afford to look after the animals properly in big happy environments, don’t have so many.”

Terri says there’s lots of government aid to help zoological facilities, which means there are many great opportunities for operators to do good things with their facilities. Half the problem, she claims, is the fact that there’s too much red tape in most operations. “At Australia Zoo, there’s no red tape and no bureaucracy. That means, if we get feedback from a visitor to say they want bottle warmers in the baby change rooms for heating formula, we can have them in place by the next day.”

Her advice to operators is to get a good grant writer to secure as much government funding as possible. She also advises tapping into theme park strategies to see where to make more money, such as retail and photography.

“At Australia Zoo, we have an Aussie-made shop. It’s not easy to stock it and it’s not that lucrative, but from a social entrepreneurship point of view, it’s helping artists and indigenous communities and, more importantly, it’s building the ethics of who we are and what we stand for. You need to decide whether you’re about making money or changing lives. If you give, you’ll get back.”

Another success for Terri was the recent birth of southern white rhino calves, Mango and Winston. The zoo’s five-year-old giraffe, Rosie, is also expecting her first baby. This kind of breeding programme was part of Steve’s 10-year plan to help protect African animals in the wild. Its success is testament to the Irwins’ shared passion for conservation and must give Terri comfort that she’s honouring her late husband’s precious legacy.

About Australia Zoo

Australia Zoo is located at Beerwah on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast, about an hour north of Brisbane.

The zoo is set on 100 acres and is home to more than 1,200 animals.

It takes 400 staff and more than 100 volunteers to maintain it.

Wildlife shows happen throughout the day including a midday croc feed in the zoo’s Crocoseum. Other immersive experiences include a walk with the tigers, kissing a dingo and hand-feeding a giant tortoise. There’s also a farmyard petting area and an Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital tour. All money raised from the extra activities, including the photo opportunities, goes into conservation.

A team of dedicated leaf-cutters at Australia Zoo collect two vehicle loads of eucalyptus sticks (more than 1,000kg) every day to feed the koalas.

In the African Safari Park, animals roam free in open plains and state of the art walk-through enclosures, where the public can watch them interact as they would in the wild, just as Steve had envisioned.

The Tiger Temple has been built to resemble the Angkor Wat temple in Cambodia and is the Southern Hemisphere’s only underwater viewing of tigers.
Elephantasia is Australia’s largest Asian Elephant facility. Created in 2006, the Asian-themed exhibit features a large pool with a fountain for the elephants to splash around in and a giant feature statue of Ganesh, the Hindu elephant god and lush gardens.

The Feeding Frenzy Food Court is built around trees where koalas nap while visitors eat and Bindi shares her wildlife adventures during a free children’s story time session.

 



The Tiger Temple
 


White rhino Mango was born at the park this year
 
 


The Crocoseum
 
 


A komodo
 
Terri and her children Robert and Bindi are honouring Steve’s legacy by continuing his work
Left: Australia Zoo’s koalas work their way through 1,000kg of eucalyptus sticks every day.
Steve Irwin, known as the Crocodile Hunter, tragically died in 2006 in a stingray accident, but his legacy lives on
COMPANY PROFILES
Sally Corporation

Our services include: Dark ride design & build; Redevelopment of existing attractions; High-quality [more...]
RMA Ltd

RMA Ltd is a one-stop global company that can design, build and produce from a greenfield site upw [more...]
Red Raion

Founded in 2014, Red Raion is the CGI studio specialized in media based attractions. [more...]
iPlayCO

iPlayCo was established in 1999. [more...]
+ More profiles  
FEATURED SUPPLIER

Attractions industry to reunite this September at IAAPA Expo Europe in London
For the first time in more than a decade, industry leaders from across the global attractions industry will once again gather in London as part of the annual IAAPA Expo Europe, the sector’s premier international event. [more...]
VIDEO GALLERY

Proslide Tech Inc - ProSlide's all-in-one waterplay entertainment center
RideHOUSE is an iconic waterplay complex purposefully designed for young kids and families to enjoy. Find out more...
More videos:
Red Raion TV - Testimonial: Leolandia – Red Raion
Red Raion Showreel 2021 – Red Raion
Red Raion TV - Opening Event: FICO Eataly World – Red Raion
+ More videos  

CATALOGUE GALLERY
 

+ More catalogues  
DIRECTORY
+ More directory  
DIARY

 

27-29 Sep 2022

International Congress on Thermal Tourism

Ourense, Ourense, Spain
13 Oct 2022

VAC 2022

The ICC Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
+ More diary  
LATEST ISSUES
+ View Magazine Archive

Attractions Management

Issue 2 Volume 27


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Management

Issue 1 Volume 27


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Management

Issue 4 Volume 26


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Management

2021 issue 3


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Management News

06 Apr 2020 issue 153


View on turning pages
Download PDF
View archive
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Handbook

2019


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription
 
ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
 
ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT
ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT NEWS
ATTRACTIONS HANDBOOK
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS
ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media
Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2022
Jobs    News   Products   Magazine
Profile
Terri Irwin

The conservationist, social entrepreneur and zoo operator describes how she’s continuing late husband Steve Irwin’s work, which includes opening an animal attraction in Las Vegas

By Jennifer Harbottle | Published in Attractions Management 2013 issue 3


For most people who suffer the bereavement of a partner, having to deal with their grief is hard enough. When Terri Irwin’s husband Steve died, she not only lost her soulmate, but also her business partner and the face behind their family brand.

Suddenly in charge of their business – Australia Zoo – Terri had to adapt quickly to her role as attractions operator, at the same time as being a single mum of two and honouring Steve’s legacy. It’s a task most would find overwhelming. “When Steve died, I was scared, not only by the deep level of grief I was feeling, but also how I was going to cope with everything from a personal and business point of view,” Terri recalls.

Seven years on, Terri’s the same gentle, committed and self-deprecating personality she was then. Australia Zoo is thriving and the many conservation projects Steve and Terri set up together to protect wildlife all over the world are still regular beneficiaries of money raised by the Irwin family business. Terri’s also still busy with filming commitments, only now it’s her children Bindi and Robert who are the stars.

Land Down Under
American-born Terri Irwin was based in Eugene, Oregon running a wildlife rehabilitation organisation before she moved to Australia to be with Steve. In 1992, when they married, Steve’s parents retired from their family-owned attraction called the Queensland Reptile and Fauna Park, where Steve was also working, and the newlyweds were put in charge. “We didn’t break even at the park for the first few years,” admits Terri, who says the pair was so broke they couldn’t afford to buy the business from Steve’s parents, agreeing to pay them a wage for life instead.

When they took over the ownership of the park, it was four-acres and employed two full-time staff. Even then, and despite the fact they had little money, Terri says Steve had big plans for it. “He saw it as an opportunity to showcase and help all of the wildlife he was so passionate about,” she explains.

A month into marriage, Steve and Terri began filming footage of themselves in the Australian outback wrestling snakes and crocodiles and discovering wild animals. At the same time, Terri sold her business in Oregon, which bankrolled the purchase of another four acres of land for the wildlife park, which Steve and Terri renamed Australia Zoo.

While Steve was talented with wildlife and consummately practical – “he was a fitter, a joiner and could even mill his own timber” – it was Terri who had the larger marketing perspective. “The first time I wanted to send out a press release, Steve told me it wasn’t how things were done,” she remembers. “But I loved working with Steve – he always challenged me. He was the one with the vision. I would tell him we didn’t have any money but he’d build it anyway.”

Television career
To afford Steve’s grand plans, Terri thought it’d be a good idea to approach a production company to sell them Steve’s documentaries. They’d been filming for three years by this point and had hours of footage. Terri cringes as she recalls sitting in the office of Discovery Channel in her eighties-suit with padded shoulders (“the only one I had”) and being told by the board of tv executives that nobody would watch a documentary where Steve was in shot so much. “They didn’t like what we showed them of Steve with the animals. They told us wildlife programmes weren’t filmed like that – they needed 80 per cent animals, 20 per cent presenter. In ours, Steve was in every shot.”

Serendipitously, a new wildlife channel for tv called Animal Planet was just starting up at the time and signed their documentary instead. By the time Steve died, his tv series The Crocodile Hunter had 80 million viewers worldwide.

All money earned from the tv work was ploughed back into Australia Zoo. Steve was determined to make it the biggest and best wildlife conservation facility in the world, which meant he had to work even harder on his documentaries. “Every time Steve had a dream for a new project, he’d do more filming in order to fund it.”

They created a management team to help run the zoo, including Steve’s best mate Wes Mannion, who is zoo director, and general manager Frank Muscillo, who’s married to Steve’s older sister. In 2004, the Irwins opened an Australian wildlife hospital next to the zoo to rehabilitate injured or endangered animals.

Planning ahead
Alongside funding and implementing new zoo exhibits, the Irwins began purchasing land in and around Queensland in order to preserve ecosystems in that part of Australia. On some of this land, they built animal rehabilitation and release facilities. At the time of his death, the media speculated that the Irwins had amassed a property portfolio estimated at AUD$20 million (US$19m, £12.2m, E14.3m).

Before Steve died, he’d put together a 10-year plan, which was his vision for wildlife conservation. Part of that involved making Terri promise she’d never let go of Australia Zoo or the family’s conservation properties if anything happened to him. At the zoo, his plan was to complete the half-finished South-East Asia area and build a new African open-range safari attraction, including the acquisition of some wildlife for both of these sections, which has now been achieved.

Another part of the 10-year plan was to develop an animal attraction in Las Vegas, similar to Australia Zoo. According to Terri, Steve wanted it to be a way of representing Australia in the US “Steve style”. Terri has the land options and the investors to go ahead with the project in Vegas, but is still negotiating with the various entities.

I ask if fulfilling Steve’s legacy and running a world-class attraction sometimes gets too much. “I’m lucky to earn a living doing what I love,” she replies. “I’ve never felt like packing it in and have always honoured Steve’s promise. I have good help – people who are better at this than I am. Plus, I’ve done everything in the business; I’ve cleaned cages, I’ve done the marketing, I know where the cabling is. It’s grown organically, so hasn’t been as daunting as if I’d come straight into this huge business. After Steve died, despite my grief and fear, I was always driven to make things better, not just keep them the same.”

Today, Australia Zoo is 100 acres and employs 400 staff and volunteers. Since she took over sole ownership of Australia Zoo, Terri has completed the South-East Asia section, opened an African safari exhibit and held onto all 80,000 acres of conservation properties. In 2008, she oversaw the building of a new Aus$5m (US$4.8m, £3m, E3.6m) Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital, which is the largest of its kind in Australia. The Hospital takes in more than 7,500 animals a year, and along with the conservation properties it funds worldwide, the zoo’s also the sole or majority benefactor of a number of wildlife charity projects globally.

Terri says the hospital alone costs Aus$2.5m (US$2.4m, £1.5m, E1.8m) a year to run. The facility is donation dependant, with Australia Zoo covering the deficit – In 2012, this was to the tune of $1.3m, after $700,000 was raised through public donations. “We’re social entrepreneurs – it’s what we want to do,” says Terri. “Our profit margin isn’t high, but we’re joyful every day.”

Tough conditions
Terri admits that running the business hasn’t always been easy. At the time of Steve’s death, Australia Zoo was growing at 60 per cent per year and getting almost one million visitors annually. After he died, there was an increase in numbers as well wishers came to the zoo, but since then, the business has been hit by the GFC and colossal rains in Queensland and now visitor numbers are more like 600,000 per annum.

To allow for the hit to the zoo, Terri has got rid of anything that isn’t fundamental to the business, including a whale-watching company and a travel agency. She admits the zoo’s growth path has slowed. “I run the company with the priority of animals first, staff second and visitors third. If the animals need something, that comes before anything else. If things get tough, we go on the skinny – we don’t can the project,” she explains. “I may not be able to give the tiger unit in Sumatra as much money for their anti-poaching activities, but I still give something and no one at the project loses their job.”

When Steve Irwin died, the zoo’s main brand ambassador went too. How do they cope without its main attraction? “Steve stood for so much. He always said he didn’t mind if he got remembered or not, just that his message did. We still use his pictures, he’s the embodiment of the ethics of the Irwin family and Australia Zoo.”

Now that Bindi is a tv star in her own right, (her show, Bindi’s Bootcamp, is set at the zoo and airs on Discovery Kids), Australia Zoo also has the income from her filming. This eases the burden financially, but Terri acknowledges that Steve was one of a kind. “No one is ever going to come close to him, so we still use him as a major brand of what we do. We couldn’t ever afford in terms of marketing the exposure he gives us and our projects. Right now, Steve’s in 500 million houses in 42 countries worldwide.”

An issue of scale
Terri believes that despite the benefit of the tv royalties, she faces the same issues as any other wildlife operator. “Zoos have a responsibility to be a caretaker, not just a showcase for animals,” she says. “A zoo can be a life-changing experience if you set it up and package it to the guests properly – if you can feel and smell and connect with an animal, it gets into your heart and touches you and you fall in love with it.”

Terri believes that all too often, visitors see sad animals and sad staff at animal attractions. “If visitors see pacing animals, they won’t come back. If you can’t afford to look after the animals properly in big happy environments, don’t have so many.”

Terri says there’s lots of government aid to help zoological facilities, which means there are many great opportunities for operators to do good things with their facilities. Half the problem, she claims, is the fact that there’s too much red tape in most operations. “At Australia Zoo, there’s no red tape and no bureaucracy. That means, if we get feedback from a visitor to say they want bottle warmers in the baby change rooms for heating formula, we can have them in place by the next day.”

Her advice to operators is to get a good grant writer to secure as much government funding as possible. She also advises tapping into theme park strategies to see where to make more money, such as retail and photography.

“At Australia Zoo, we have an Aussie-made shop. It’s not easy to stock it and it’s not that lucrative, but from a social entrepreneurship point of view, it’s helping artists and indigenous communities and, more importantly, it’s building the ethics of who we are and what we stand for. You need to decide whether you’re about making money or changing lives. If you give, you’ll get back.”

Another success for Terri was the recent birth of southern white rhino calves, Mango and Winston. The zoo’s five-year-old giraffe, Rosie, is also expecting her first baby. This kind of breeding programme was part of Steve’s 10-year plan to help protect African animals in the wild. Its success is testament to the Irwins’ shared passion for conservation and must give Terri comfort that she’s honouring her late husband’s precious legacy.

About Australia Zoo

Australia Zoo is located at Beerwah on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast, about an hour north of Brisbane.

The zoo is set on 100 acres and is home to more than 1,200 animals.

It takes 400 staff and more than 100 volunteers to maintain it.

Wildlife shows happen throughout the day including a midday croc feed in the zoo’s Crocoseum. Other immersive experiences include a walk with the tigers, kissing a dingo and hand-feeding a giant tortoise. There’s also a farmyard petting area and an Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital tour. All money raised from the extra activities, including the photo opportunities, goes into conservation.

A team of dedicated leaf-cutters at Australia Zoo collect two vehicle loads of eucalyptus sticks (more than 1,000kg) every day to feed the koalas.

In the African Safari Park, animals roam free in open plains and state of the art walk-through enclosures, where the public can watch them interact as they would in the wild, just as Steve had envisioned.

The Tiger Temple has been built to resemble the Angkor Wat temple in Cambodia and is the Southern Hemisphere’s only underwater viewing of tigers.
Elephantasia is Australia’s largest Asian Elephant facility. Created in 2006, the Asian-themed exhibit features a large pool with a fountain for the elephants to splash around in and a giant feature statue of Ganesh, the Hindu elephant god and lush gardens.

The Feeding Frenzy Food Court is built around trees where koalas nap while visitors eat and Bindi shares her wildlife adventures during a free children’s story time session.

 



The Tiger Temple
 


White rhino Mango was born at the park this year
 
 


The Crocoseum
 
 


A komodo
 
Terri and her children Robert and Bindi are honouring Steve’s legacy by continuing his work
Left: Australia Zoo’s koalas work their way through 1,000kg of eucalyptus sticks every day.
Steve Irwin, known as the Crocodile Hunter, tragically died in 2006 in a stingray accident, but his legacy lives on
LATEST NEWS
Queen Elizabeth II to be commemorated by Thames' Illuminated River
Illuminated River, described as the world’s longest public artwork, will be lit in commemoration of the passing of Her Majesty The Queen, Elizabeth II.
Brad Pitt makes debut as sculptor at Finnish art museum
Hollywood superstar, Brad Pitt, has made his debut as a sculptor as part of British artist Thomas Houseago’s first ever exhibition in the Nordic countries.
World's longest and 'technologically advanced' zipline planned for Iceland
A 1km-long zipline offering riders speeds of 120km/h is set to open in Iceland later this year.
Triotech secures deal to supply rides for Puy Du Fou Asia's first Chinese attraction
Triotech has secured a deal to supply its interactive ride technology for the SAGA Experience, an immersive attraction being developed in the heart of Shanghai, China, by Puy du Fou Asia.
Tangled attraction among new additions revealed for Disneyland Paris Resort
A Tangled-themed family ride is among a range of new attractions revealed for the Walt Disney Studios Park at Disneyland Paris Resort, France.
Merlin takes over operations at UK's largest indoor waterpark
Merlin Entertainments has secured a contract to operate Blackpool Sandcastle, the UK's largest indoor waterpark.
HBG Design behind Michigan’s six-storey Aquadome inspired by the sun’s path across the sky
Hospitality and entertainment design firm HBG Design is helming the design of Michigan's new Gun Lake Casino Resort Aquadome – a glass-roofed, climate-controlled, indoor landscaped pool and event centre atrium environment.
IAAPA recognition for Blackpool Pleasure Beach to mark century-old relationship
Blackpool Pleasure Beach will be honoured at the IAAPA Expo Europe, being held in London later this month.
Preparations for construction of £250m Therme Manchester project get underway
Plans to start work on the UK’s first city-based wellbeing resort, Therme Manchester, at TraffordCity have progressed this week with preparations to clear the current site.
Merlin to open Legoland Resort in Belgium by 2027
Merlin Entertainments Group has revealed plans for a new Legoland theme park near Charleroi Airport in Belgium.
First images released for Merlin's Jumanji land at Chessington
Visuals have been released for the new Jumanji-themed land at Chessington World of Adventures in London, UK, which is set to open to the public in 2023.
Universal's Epic Universe set to open in 2025
Building work on Universal's Epic Universe – a new theme park at the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida, US – is advancing and the park is set to open to visitors in 2025.
+ More news   
 
COMPANY PROFILES
Sally Corporation

Our services include: Dark ride design & build; Redevelopment of existing attractions; High-quality [more...]
RMA Ltd

RMA Ltd is a one-stop global company that can design, build and produce from a greenfield site upw [more...]
Red Raion

Founded in 2014, Red Raion is the CGI studio specialized in media based attractions. [more...]
iPlayCO

iPlayCo was established in 1999. [more...]
+ More profiles  
FEATURED SUPPLIER

Attractions industry to reunite this September at IAAPA Expo Europe in London
For the first time in more than a decade, industry leaders from across the global attractions industry will once again gather in London as part of the annual IAAPA Expo Europe, the sector’s premier international event. [more...]
VIDEO GALLERY

Proslide Tech Inc - ProSlide's all-in-one waterplay entertainment center
RideHOUSE is an iconic waterplay complex purposefully designed for young kids and families to enjoy. Find out more...
More videos:
Red Raion TV - Testimonial: Leolandia – Red Raion
Red Raion Showreel 2021 – Red Raion
Red Raion TV - Opening Event: FICO Eataly World – Red Raion
+ More videos  

CATALOGUE GALLERY
+ More catalogues  
DIRECTORY
+ More directory  
DIARY

 

27-29 Sep 2022

International Congress on Thermal Tourism

Ourense, Ourense, Spain
13 Oct 2022

VAC 2022

The ICC Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
+ More diary  
 


ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media
Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2022

ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT NEWS
ATTRACTIONS HANDBOOK
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS