Interview - Alvaro Silberstein | attractionsmanagement.com
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Interview
Alvaro Silberstein

Bringing together a passionate community of explorers, Wheel the World is opening new doors for disability tourism. Its co-founder, Alvaro Silberstein, speaks to Attractions Management about the company, his story and the organisation’s grand plans to bring accessible tourism to the mainstream

By Tom Anstey | Published in Attractions Management 2019 issue 2


Alvaro Silberstein has been a wheelchair user since the age of 18. Now 33 years old, the Chilean says he’s always pushed himself to make his life as normal as possible.

Wanting to explore the world and visit wild tourist destinations, one location – Torres del Paine National Park in Patagonia, Chile – had always been a special dream of his.

A few years ago, his best friend, Camillo Navarro, approached him to see if the pair could feasibly organise a trip to the destination. They contacted several tour operators and local travel services, who told them they had never seen a wheelchair being used in the park.

To make their dream a reality, the duo would have to do some extended research, which led to the discovery of a specially manufactured wheelchair specifically for traversing rough terrain – the Joëlette.

“The technology would allow us to do the W Trek – a five-day hike along Torres del Paine’s most famous route,” says Alvaro. “But it was expensive, costing US$8,000 to buy and ship it there and we didn’t have that kind of money.”

To raise the necessary funds, Silberstein and Navarro decided to transform the trip into a project, fundraising the venture through a series of sponsors. Setting out with a plan to purchase and leave the equipment behind, also training local guides on how to use the technology so the experience could be repeated, Silberstein and Navarro went on the life-changing adventure.

“It was amazing for me, for my friends and for people who worked in the travel industry in Patagonia because we didn’t know if it would be possible,” he says.

“We filmed a low-cost documentary telling our story. As a result, our plans went viral on social media and we started receiving requests from people all over the world wanting to take the trip themselves.

“We started organising trips for others purely because we wanted them to enjoy the amazing experience we did. Not long after, we co-founded Wheel the World.”

Empowering expansion
With a goal to “empower people with disabilities to explore the world without limits”, in 2018, Wheel the World started replicating what Silberstein and Navarro had done in Patagonia, repeating the process with other wild travel destinations in South America – starting with Easter Island.

“We looked at how tourists would normally explore the island, which included a bike ride, hikes to archaeological sites, trips to the beach and scuba diving. We then established how we could enable all these experiences for people with disabilities,” explains Silberstein.

“We took a range of equipment to the island, including special bikes, a hiking chair and beach-compatible wheelchairs. We then trained two scuba diving instructors on how to assist people with different disabilities to take part.

“We also found accessible accommodation and ways to transport our customers to locations around the island.”

From there, the company expanded its reach across the Americas, with trips across both continents to Chile, Mexico, Peru, Hawaii and California. Wheel the World would later introduce a safari experience in Tanzania.

“The goal for us is to become the marketplace for accessible travel and to connect people with disabilities,” says Silberstein. “We’re continuing to create experiences from scratch as we have done in multiple locations now and we’re also partnering with local operators who already offer services to people with disabilities so we can promote these things as well.”

Life-changing
Depending on the experience, costs can range anywhere from US$100 to US$8,000, though the average cost works out at around US$1,000 per person. According to Silberstein, the experiences are worth every penny.

“It’s very emotional for our clients,” he says. “From first-hand experience with my trip to Patagonia, you never think that kind of experience will be available to you. To have an adventure in somewhere like that, realising that it’s possible and being there in the middle of nature exploring that beautiful place with your friends, it’s super special and that’s why I committed full time to building this organisation.”

Eye in the sky
Wheel the World recently made headlines by creating an accessible tour set high in the Andes Mountains of Peru to the ancient Incan citadel of Machu Picchu.

One of the seven wonders of the world, the Unesco World Heritage Site was previously very difficult or impossible to access for many disabled visitors. The experience created by Wheel the World means the site is more accessible than ever before to disabled visitors, with the tour allowing them to explore the sanctuary in places that would have previously proved impossible.

The entire experience lasts a total of five days, starting with an accessible tour of Cusco city on day one.

On the second day, guests travel to the Inca Ceremonial Center of Sacsayhuaman. Using the special hiking wheelchair to travel to the top of the citadel with trained tour operators. From there, they can observe a special view of Cusco from high up in the surrounding hills.

For day three, visitors explore the Sacred Valley for a day using accessible bikes, ending their journey with a stay in an accessible hotel in the valley.

On the final day, they embark on a three-hour train journey to Machu Picchu. They then climb to the summit using hiking wheelchairs, spending three hours on-site, before returning to Cusco. There is an additional optional fifth day, where guests can choose to visit a lake in the Sacred Valley for a kayaking experience using adaptive kayaks.

“We’ve found a way to give disabled visitors the chance to have a fun and interesting experience that allows you to explore much more of the sanctuary in a safe and more accessible way,” says Silberstein. “Using these different technologies makes it possible. We want to make these experiences available to as many people as possible.”

Challenges and successes
Doing something in areas where similar feats have never or rarely been attempted has presented new challenges to Wheel the World. Not only did Silberstein and Navarro have to strategically plan out each trip with accessibility at the forefront of everything, but they also had to convince authorities that it was viable for repeat trips.

“Getting the people who run things like national parks and travel attractions to collaborate with us is the main challenge we continue to face,” explains Silberstein.

“There’s a range of equipment if you don’t want to modify your infrastructure. It’s about providing the right information to accommodate these visitors and to make services more accessible.

“We want to inspire accessibility everywhere. It’s not just one organisation doing this. It’s about getting the governments and different organisations related to tourism to commit as well.”

Future plans
Looking forward, within the next few months, Wheel the World will launch new trips in Maui, Costa Rica and the Galapagos Islands, with even more projects planned for the future.

In its first year, the company has successfully had more than 500 disabled customers travel to experience exotic locations all over the world. For Silberstein, it’s the reason he started the business, replicating the emotions he felt for thousands of people in the future.

“In one year, hundreds of people have travelled to places they wouldn’t have thought possible,” he says. “What makes us really proud and happy is when we have a new customer go to a place that they wouldn’t have been able to otherwise. I love to hear from them about these amazing experiences in these extraordinary places they’ve travelled.

“We have a special purpose – to empower people with disabilities to explore the world without limits. We want to inspire accessibility everywhere.”

The Technology

The Joëlette
The primary model for Wheel the World’s trips, the Joëltette is an all-terrain one-wheeled chair that enables any person with reduced mobility or disability to take part in hiking excursions or running activities with the help of two guides.

To operate the chair, the rear guide handles balance, while the front controls traction and steers.

Designed for both family outings and more intense sports and recreation, the chair offers users access to significantly rougher terrain that a classic wheelchair couldn’t handle. The chairs have suspension and disc brakes, so you can go downhill in a safe and controlled way.

The design is also compact and folds down into an easily transportable size.

Force G Handcycle
The Force G handcycle’s aerodynamic design offers an adjustable seat suitable for people with a range of disabilities and is designed specifically for people with lower body paraplegia or amputees. Riders use their hands to pedal and steer instead of their legs.

Beach Wheelchair
The beach wheelchair is an ideal aid for use on sand and in water. Designed to be simple, highly portable and submersible with no parts to rust or corrode, the chair can easily go from land to sea and comes with inflatable collars, inflatable footrests and beach wheelchair sun canopies.

Mountain Trike
An all-terrain, self-propelled chair, the Mountain Trike is ideal for outdoor use. For those who find it difficult to self propel the model can be converted into an electric eTrike. Comes with suspension and disc brakes for ultimate control.

Grit Freedom Chair
Developed by MIT engineers, this easy-to-push, lever-driven wheelchair comes armed with rugged mountain bike wheels, a big, sturdy front wheel that doesn’t get stuck, and optional trail handles, allowing users to make their own path through difficult terrain.

Some of the world’s most famous sites are now accessible for people with different disabilities
Wheel the World’s main goal is to completely redefine what is possible in the recreation sector for people with disabilities
Wheel the World’s main goal is to completely redefine what is possible in the recreation sector for people with disabilities
Wheel the World’s main goal is to completely redefine what is possible in the recreation sector for people with disabilities
Parts of Machu Picchu that were previously inaccessible to disabled tourists can now be explored
Some of the world’s most famous sites are now accessible for people with different disabilities
Silberstein wants to raise awareness for diablsed people who wish to live their life to the fullest
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Jobs   News   Products   Magazine
Interview
Alvaro Silberstein

Bringing together a passionate community of explorers, Wheel the World is opening new doors for disability tourism. Its co-founder, Alvaro Silberstein, speaks to Attractions Management about the company, his story and the organisation’s grand plans to bring accessible tourism to the mainstream

By Tom Anstey | Published in Attractions Management 2019 issue 2


Alvaro Silberstein has been a wheelchair user since the age of 18. Now 33 years old, the Chilean says he’s always pushed himself to make his life as normal as possible.

Wanting to explore the world and visit wild tourist destinations, one location – Torres del Paine National Park in Patagonia, Chile – had always been a special dream of his.

A few years ago, his best friend, Camillo Navarro, approached him to see if the pair could feasibly organise a trip to the destination. They contacted several tour operators and local travel services, who told them they had never seen a wheelchair being used in the park.

To make their dream a reality, the duo would have to do some extended research, which led to the discovery of a specially manufactured wheelchair specifically for traversing rough terrain – the Joëlette.

“The technology would allow us to do the W Trek – a five-day hike along Torres del Paine’s most famous route,” says Alvaro. “But it was expensive, costing US$8,000 to buy and ship it there and we didn’t have that kind of money.”

To raise the necessary funds, Silberstein and Navarro decided to transform the trip into a project, fundraising the venture through a series of sponsors. Setting out with a plan to purchase and leave the equipment behind, also training local guides on how to use the technology so the experience could be repeated, Silberstein and Navarro went on the life-changing adventure.

“It was amazing for me, for my friends and for people who worked in the travel industry in Patagonia because we didn’t know if it would be possible,” he says.

“We filmed a low-cost documentary telling our story. As a result, our plans went viral on social media and we started receiving requests from people all over the world wanting to take the trip themselves.

“We started organising trips for others purely because we wanted them to enjoy the amazing experience we did. Not long after, we co-founded Wheel the World.”

Empowering expansion
With a goal to “empower people with disabilities to explore the world without limits”, in 2018, Wheel the World started replicating what Silberstein and Navarro had done in Patagonia, repeating the process with other wild travel destinations in South America – starting with Easter Island.

“We looked at how tourists would normally explore the island, which included a bike ride, hikes to archaeological sites, trips to the beach and scuba diving. We then established how we could enable all these experiences for people with disabilities,” explains Silberstein.

“We took a range of equipment to the island, including special bikes, a hiking chair and beach-compatible wheelchairs. We then trained two scuba diving instructors on how to assist people with different disabilities to take part.

“We also found accessible accommodation and ways to transport our customers to locations around the island.”

From there, the company expanded its reach across the Americas, with trips across both continents to Chile, Mexico, Peru, Hawaii and California. Wheel the World would later introduce a safari experience in Tanzania.

“The goal for us is to become the marketplace for accessible travel and to connect people with disabilities,” says Silberstein. “We’re continuing to create experiences from scratch as we have done in multiple locations now and we’re also partnering with local operators who already offer services to people with disabilities so we can promote these things as well.”

Life-changing
Depending on the experience, costs can range anywhere from US$100 to US$8,000, though the average cost works out at around US$1,000 per person. According to Silberstein, the experiences are worth every penny.

“It’s very emotional for our clients,” he says. “From first-hand experience with my trip to Patagonia, you never think that kind of experience will be available to you. To have an adventure in somewhere like that, realising that it’s possible and being there in the middle of nature exploring that beautiful place with your friends, it’s super special and that’s why I committed full time to building this organisation.”

Eye in the sky
Wheel the World recently made headlines by creating an accessible tour set high in the Andes Mountains of Peru to the ancient Incan citadel of Machu Picchu.

One of the seven wonders of the world, the Unesco World Heritage Site was previously very difficult or impossible to access for many disabled visitors. The experience created by Wheel the World means the site is more accessible than ever before to disabled visitors, with the tour allowing them to explore the sanctuary in places that would have previously proved impossible.

The entire experience lasts a total of five days, starting with an accessible tour of Cusco city on day one.

On the second day, guests travel to the Inca Ceremonial Center of Sacsayhuaman. Using the special hiking wheelchair to travel to the top of the citadel with trained tour operators. From there, they can observe a special view of Cusco from high up in the surrounding hills.

For day three, visitors explore the Sacred Valley for a day using accessible bikes, ending their journey with a stay in an accessible hotel in the valley.

On the final day, they embark on a three-hour train journey to Machu Picchu. They then climb to the summit using hiking wheelchairs, spending three hours on-site, before returning to Cusco. There is an additional optional fifth day, where guests can choose to visit a lake in the Sacred Valley for a kayaking experience using adaptive kayaks.

“We’ve found a way to give disabled visitors the chance to have a fun and interesting experience that allows you to explore much more of the sanctuary in a safe and more accessible way,” says Silberstein. “Using these different technologies makes it possible. We want to make these experiences available to as many people as possible.”

Challenges and successes
Doing something in areas where similar feats have never or rarely been attempted has presented new challenges to Wheel the World. Not only did Silberstein and Navarro have to strategically plan out each trip with accessibility at the forefront of everything, but they also had to convince authorities that it was viable for repeat trips.

“Getting the people who run things like national parks and travel attractions to collaborate with us is the main challenge we continue to face,” explains Silberstein.

“There’s a range of equipment if you don’t want to modify your infrastructure. It’s about providing the right information to accommodate these visitors and to make services more accessible.

“We want to inspire accessibility everywhere. It’s not just one organisation doing this. It’s about getting the governments and different organisations related to tourism to commit as well.”

Future plans
Looking forward, within the next few months, Wheel the World will launch new trips in Maui, Costa Rica and the Galapagos Islands, with even more projects planned for the future.

In its first year, the company has successfully had more than 500 disabled customers travel to experience exotic locations all over the world. For Silberstein, it’s the reason he started the business, replicating the emotions he felt for thousands of people in the future.

“In one year, hundreds of people have travelled to places they wouldn’t have thought possible,” he says. “What makes us really proud and happy is when we have a new customer go to a place that they wouldn’t have been able to otherwise. I love to hear from them about these amazing experiences in these extraordinary places they’ve travelled.

“We have a special purpose – to empower people with disabilities to explore the world without limits. We want to inspire accessibility everywhere.”

The Technology

The Joëlette
The primary model for Wheel the World’s trips, the Joëltette is an all-terrain one-wheeled chair that enables any person with reduced mobility or disability to take part in hiking excursions or running activities with the help of two guides.

To operate the chair, the rear guide handles balance, while the front controls traction and steers.

Designed for both family outings and more intense sports and recreation, the chair offers users access to significantly rougher terrain that a classic wheelchair couldn’t handle. The chairs have suspension and disc brakes, so you can go downhill in a safe and controlled way.

The design is also compact and folds down into an easily transportable size.

Force G Handcycle
The Force G handcycle’s aerodynamic design offers an adjustable seat suitable for people with a range of disabilities and is designed specifically for people with lower body paraplegia or amputees. Riders use their hands to pedal and steer instead of their legs.

Beach Wheelchair
The beach wheelchair is an ideal aid for use on sand and in water. Designed to be simple, highly portable and submersible with no parts to rust or corrode, the chair can easily go from land to sea and comes with inflatable collars, inflatable footrests and beach wheelchair sun canopies.

Mountain Trike
An all-terrain, self-propelled chair, the Mountain Trike is ideal for outdoor use. For those who find it difficult to self propel the model can be converted into an electric eTrike. Comes with suspension and disc brakes for ultimate control.

Grit Freedom Chair
Developed by MIT engineers, this easy-to-push, lever-driven wheelchair comes armed with rugged mountain bike wheels, a big, sturdy front wheel that doesn’t get stuck, and optional trail handles, allowing users to make their own path through difficult terrain.

Some of the world’s most famous sites are now accessible for people with different disabilities
Wheel the World’s main goal is to completely redefine what is possible in the recreation sector for people with disabilities
Wheel the World’s main goal is to completely redefine what is possible in the recreation sector for people with disabilities
Wheel the World’s main goal is to completely redefine what is possible in the recreation sector for people with disabilities
Parts of Machu Picchu that were previously inaccessible to disabled tourists can now be explored
Some of the world’s most famous sites are now accessible for people with different disabilities
Silberstein wants to raise awareness for diablsed people who wish to live their life to the fullest
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COMPANY PROFILES
instantprint

We’re a Yorkshire-based online printer, founded in 2009 by Adam Carnell and James Kinsella. [more...]
Holovis

Holovis is a privately owned company established in 2004 by CEO Stuart Hetherington. [more...]
Vekoma Rides Manufacturing B.V.

Vekoma Rides has a large variety of coasters and attractions. [more...]
IAAPA EMEA

IAAPA Expo Europe was established in 2006 and has grown to the largest international conference and [more...]
+ More profiles  
FEATURED SUPPLIER

IAAPA helps move leisure and attractions industry forward with IAAPA Expo Europe
As the leisure and attractions industry continues to recover and look to the future, IAAPA, the global association for the attractions industry, is moving forward with plans to host IAAPA Expo Europe this September. [more...]
VIDEO GALLERY

Proslide Tech Inc - ProSlide | Atlantis Dubai
More videos:
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CATALOGUE GALLERY
+ More catalogues  
DIRECTORY
+ More directory  
DIARY

 

28-30 Sep 2021

International Wellness Tourism Conference

Carillon Miami Wellness Resort, Miami, United States
01-07 Dec 2022

World Leisure Congress 2022

tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
+ More diary  
 


ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media
Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2021

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