Conservation - Panda Power | attractionsmanagement.com
POST YOUR JOB ONLINE
Free ezine/digital edition sign up
Jobs   News   Features   Video    Products   Profiles   Magazine   Handbook   Advertise  
Conservation
Panda Power

Giant panda leasing is now big business around the world, but zoos looking to do deals with China must be prepared for a huge investment of both time and money. Jak Phillips examines the bare necessities of the practice

By Jak Phillips | Published in Attractions Management 2014 issue 1

After five years of intense political negotiations between Beijing and Britain, the specially chartered plane finally touched down at Edinburgh airport. Anticipation was high amid the tangible sense of history in the making.

Having tracked the historic flight with 24-hour rolling news coverage, the world's media scrambled to snatch a glimpse of the two VIPs from China. They emerged, flanked by a dedicated team of aides, while high-ranking politicians waited in the wings to greet them. But it wasn't the Chinese Premier disembarking from the aircraft. It was a pair of giant pandas.

The hubris offers a telling insight into the peculiar practice of panda leasing. The pandas - Tian Tian and Yang Guang - were en route to Edinburgh Zoo to become the UK's first resident pandas in 17 years. Aside from five years of cajoling between the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS - the charity that owns Edinburgh Zoo) and the Chinese Wildlife Conservation Association, the deal to lease the pandas involved political and diplomatic negotiations at the very highest level.

Costs and conservation
In addition to the extra staff they require, the pandas - which remain the property of China - cost $1m (E726,607, £609,998) per annum over the 10-year period. And that's before you factor in the estimated £70,000 ($114,754, E83,381) the zoo must fork out each year for the pandas' 18,000kg of specially-grown bamboo. What's more, any cubs produced by the pair would be returned to China after two years. So why did the zoo go to all that trouble?

Apart from it being something of a coup (Britain’s last resident pandas, Ming Ming and Bao Bao, left London Zoo in 1994) the gains – according to the RZSS – were seen as both conservational and financial.

The zoo’s director of giant pandas, Iain Valentine, says: “RZSS sought to include giant pandas as part of their collection for a variety of reasons. Primarily as pandas are seriously endangered and we believe Scotland’s expertise in animal nutrition, genetics, embryology, immunology and veterinary medicine could add to the overarching conservation programme, but also as they are a flagship species to highlight other conservation work.

“The commercial benefits were obviously part of the picture too.” He says visitor numbers spiked by 50 per cent in the first year of the pandas’ residency, covering the costs of the lease fee.

Media attention, public affection
Traditionally, zoos that lease pandas expect to see a drop-off in visitors by the end of the second year when the initial excitement has ebbed away, but Valentine says that Edinburgh Zoo has evaded this, with its pair of pandas receiving their one millionth visit in December 2013 – two years after they first arrived. “Our business model regarding giant pandas has always been extremely conservative. To date we’ve not seen any tail off in interest and we’ve bucked the trend for a panda zoo in year two,” he says.

“Realistically there’ll be a reduction in visitor levels at some point, however no zoo that has ever had giant pandas in recent years have ever returned them – all have extended their agreements.”

Of course, the biggest boon for generating visits and publicity is the birth of a panda cub. At 1/900th of their mother’s size – one of the smallest ratios for a newborn mammal – panda cubs are appealing to visitors and newspaper editors alike, driving up gate receipts and earning huge amounts of publicity.

The media went into minor frenzy last summer after speculation that Edinburgh’s Tian Tian might be pregnant. However, in the end it’s suspected she may have miscarried.

In the absence of nature’s miracles, zoos have been forced to explore innovative showcasing methods to maintain the panda buzz. Toronto Zoo became the world’s latest recipient of cubs when it welcomed Er Shun and Da Mao in March 2013 and the centre has sought to heighten public interaction with the cuddly creatures by creating its Giant Panda Experience exhibit.

Panda interpretation
The centre offers conservation and educational features designed for adults and children, using a variety of graphics and model displays, as well as interactive features, multi-media games and audio-visual presentations.

One element particularly popular with visitors is the food display, which shows the amount of bamboo each panda eats in a day and also “panda poop” to illustrate the output of the bamboo. “At 8,000 sq ft (745 sq m), the Panda Interpretive Centre, is one of the largest panda educational facilities in the world,” says Toronto Zoo’s chief operating officer Robin Hale.

“The centre employs many state-of-the-art interactive features to convey the importance of habitat preservation for the protection and survival of many threatened and endangered wild species, not just the giant panda.”

Toronto Zoo’s approach appears to have paid off. Recent attendance figures show a year-on-year increase of 31 per cent for the five months since the exhibit opened, and the zoo says it’s ahead of budget on revenue projections.

So far it seems, the pandas are earning their keep, which is just as well when you consider their bamboo, specially flown in from a plantation in Memphis, comes to $200,000 (E145,000, £122,000) a year.

But as Hale states, it’s not just about the money. “We’ve always placed environmental protection awareness at the heart of our mission and giant pandas are global ambassadors for species survival and protection,” he says. “A key objective of the 21st century is to show people the connection between wildlife survival and protection and sustainable human development.”

Beijing benefits
The practice of obtaining pandas from China - the only country in the world to have them - is not new. Known as panda diplomacy, its growth in popularity has both aided and mirrored Beijing’s march towards superpower status.

Originating in the 1950s as a brainwave of Chairman Mao’s for opening up diplomatic channels, the gifting of pandas to foreign nations proved so popular that China gave 23 pandas to nine different countries from 1958 to 1982.

But since the mid-1980s, China has stopped giving away pandas for free, instead leasing them for around $1m (E727,000, £610,000) per year over what is typically a decade-long contract. But despite the price hike, the western public’s love of pandas remains undiminished, helped perhaps by their indelible position in the culture.

Ever since the WWF chose the panda as its logo in 1961, the bear has come to represent one of the most treasured and mysterious creatures of nature, while modern movies like box office hit Kung Fu Panda have attracted a whole new generation of fans.

Weighing up costs
But despite optimistic figures coming from Edinburgh and Toronto, Dave Towne, president of the Giant Panda Conservation Foundation for North America, insists leasing a panda is more a labour of love than a calculated business decision. “I spend most of my time discouraging various institutions from trying to go after pandas, unless they have a really strong commitment and a large cheque book,” he says, pointing out that zoos face additional costs for extra staff, feeding and entertaining Chinese visitors, as well as having to fund further research and projects.

“It’s being used effectively by China. As I’ve told a lot of elected officials in US cities - you’ve got to be brave as it’s a long commitment that will require $15-30m (E10.9-21.8m £9.1-18.2m).”

China’s use of panda diplomacy has drawn scrutiny in recent years. In a research paper published in Environmental Practice journal in September 2013, a team from Oxford suggest that since 2008, panda loans have come about at the same time China has been signing trade deals for valuable resources and technology.

The researchers claimed that panda loans made to Canada, France and Australia coincided with trade deals for uranium, while reporting that the Edinburgh panda exchange was closely followed by an estimated £2.6bn ($4bn, E3.1bn) worth of contracts between China and Scotland for the supply of salmon, renewable energy technology and Land Rover vehicles.

“No doubt it’s [panda diplomacy] about trade,” says Towne. “The Canadian loan came about after Prime Minister Stephen Harper's trade visit to China. Beijing wants a relationship with Canada because of its coal and oil supplies”

Panda protection
With China’s panda populations on an upward spike – the last WWF survey in 2004 estimated there were 1,600 pandas in the wild, and this number is since thought to have grown – leasing solely for the sake of conservation objectives now seems less plausible.

Despite attracting criticism from wildlife groups who say panda diplomacy is cruel and unnecessary, the benefits for China’s wild and captive panda populations appear to be evident.

Under wildlife treaties and the lease agreements, all of the money paid to China for the pandas is reinvested in conservation projects across the country’s north where the bears primarily reside. China gained huge media attention in September 2013 when it showcased 14 panda cubs artificially bred at Chengdu Giant Panda Breeding and Research Base, hailed as a major breakthrough.

“It’s amazing to see the amount of work that goes into preserving the pandas,” says Xiaoping Lu, division director at the CITES management authority in China. “The exchange of people between China and the US has helped towards knowledge sharing, leading to key developments in technical assistance, breeding technology and nutrition management.”

As for the pandas travelling overseas, Lu insists that no pandas are ever taken from the wild and that bears are carefully selected from the country’s estimated 300-strong population in captivity.

The notoriously secretive mating habits of the panda has led to perceptions of it being a fragile creature which is highly vulnerable to change, but this is actually a misconception.

Pandas living in captivity abroad often live to be around 30-years-old – far longer than their life expectancy in the wild, which is estimated by experts to be around 20 years.

“Pandas are very adjustable animals and the most resilient of any I’ve dealt with,” says Towne. “The care afforded to these loaned pandas is very extensive, both medically and nutritionally. They're well looked after and only two per cent die prematurely in captivity now, which is pretty incredible.”

Regardless of whether panda leasing is seen as a costly loss-leader, an investment or a huge revenue generator for the attractions, the success of conservation efforts and huge appetite for these creatures among visitors, means that successful panda diplomacy is likely to continue well into the future.


Flying Pandas - By FEDEX
The high-profile nature of modern panda leasing has turned the practice into big business - best exemplified by the fact that transporter Fedex now offers a panda express service to fly bears around the world.

Having flown polar bears, white tigers, elephants, a rhinoceros, lions, gorillas and a 13ft (4m) tiger shark, Fedex set up its panda express in 2000 and has so far carried 12 pandas across the globe.

The nine-hour flight to Edinburgh in 2011 required 21 months of co-ordination between three teams of specialists in three countries. With custom-made Plexiglas enclosures, a dedicated team of four experts on board plus copious amounts of bamboo and mineral water, the pandas received VIP care during the 5,000 mile flight from Chengdu.

While FedEx inevitably benefits from the exposure of these major media events, its managing director of UK & Ireland ground operations Trevor Hoyle is keen to point out: “FedEx Express does not charge for transporting the pandas. We feel honoured to be called upon to ensure safe passage, thus indirectly helping with the efforts to save the endangered species.”

Panda particulars

* Giant Pandas have a black and white coat, with black eye patches and ears which make them very distinctive. Adults can grow to over 1.5m long and weigh up to 150kg

* Pandas often give birth to twins. In the wild, the mother will choose one cub to raise and leave the other to die. The discarded cub is raised by zoo staff in captivity

* Panda cubs grow up to 10 times their birth weight in the first five to six weeks

* Following ancient Chinese tradition, giant panda cubs are not to be named until they have been alive for 100 days

* A giant panda can eat up to 38kg of bamboo a day and will only select the best bamboo, rejecting as much as 85 per cent of it. This can take up to 16 hours to eat each day

* The giant panda’s teeth are approximately seven times bigger than a human’s, which helps the animal chew and eat its mountains of bamboo

Source: Edinburgh Zoo, Toronto Zoo, BBC

 



Panda particulars
Although bamboo for Er Shun and Da Mao costs $200k per year, Toronto Zoo’s visitor figures have increased 30 per cent year on year
Visitors to Edinburgh Zoo spiked by 50 per cent in the first year that the pandas became residents, and interest remains high
Toronto Zoo’s Panda interpretive Centre is one of the largest panda educational sites in the world and offers many interactive exhibits
Toronto Zoo’s Panda interpretive Centre is one of the largest panda educational sites in the world and offers many interactive exhibits
Edinburgh Zoo’s Yang Guang and Tian Tian have raised the profile of the attraction
COMPANY PROFILES
IDEATTACK

IDEATTACK is a full-service planning and design company with headquarters in Los Angeles. [more...]
WhiteWater

WhiteWater was born in 1980 to create places where families unite and make joyful lasting memories [more...]
DJW

David & Lynn Willrich started the Company over thirty years ago, from the Audio Visual Department [more...]
ProSlide Technology, Inc.

A former national ski team racer, ProSlide® CEO Rick Hunter’s goal has been to integrate the smoot [more...]
+ More profiles  
FEATURED SUPPLIER

Rebranded EAG International Expo set to become leading trade show for the international entertainment and attractions industry
The newly rebranded Entertainment, Attractions and Gaming International Expo (EAG) is set to become the entertainment industry’s leading and most comprehensive trade event. [more...]
VIDEO GALLERY

Polin Waterparks & Pool Systems - Experience the experience
Have you ever wondered how the fun is created? Polin Waterparks is a global market leader in the design, manufacture and installation of waterparks and water play attractions. Find out more...
More videos:
Online Print Made Easy! – instantprint
Trailer Pinocchio - A Modern Tale VR – Red Raion
Simworx - The power to move you… – Simworx
+ More videos  

CATALOGUE GALLERY
 

+ More catalogues  
DIRECTORY
+ More directory  
DIARY

29-31 Oct 2019

Mediterranean Resort & Hotel Real Estate Forum (MR&H)

Hilton Athens, Athens, Greece
18-22 Nov 2019

IAAPA Expo

Orange County Convention Center, Orlando, United States
+ More diary  
LATEST ISSUES
+ View Magazine Archive

Attractions Management

2019 issue 3


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Management

2019 issue 2


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Management

2019 issue 1


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Management

2018 issue 4


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Management News

16 Oct 2019 issue 141


View on turning pages
Download PDF
View archive
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Handbook

2019


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription
 
ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
 
ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT
ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT NEWS
ATTRACTIONS HANDBOOK
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS
ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media, Portmill House, Portmill Lane,
Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 1DJ Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2019
Jobs   News   Products   Magazine
Conservation
Panda Power

Giant panda leasing is now big business around the world, but zoos looking to do deals with China must be prepared for a huge investment of both time and money. Jak Phillips examines the bare necessities of the practice

By Jak Phillips | Published in Attractions Management 2014 issue 1

After five years of intense political negotiations between Beijing and Britain, the specially chartered plane finally touched down at Edinburgh airport. Anticipation was high amid the tangible sense of history in the making.

Having tracked the historic flight with 24-hour rolling news coverage, the world's media scrambled to snatch a glimpse of the two VIPs from China. They emerged, flanked by a dedicated team of aides, while high-ranking politicians waited in the wings to greet them. But it wasn't the Chinese Premier disembarking from the aircraft. It was a pair of giant pandas.

The hubris offers a telling insight into the peculiar practice of panda leasing. The pandas - Tian Tian and Yang Guang - were en route to Edinburgh Zoo to become the UK's first resident pandas in 17 years. Aside from five years of cajoling between the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS - the charity that owns Edinburgh Zoo) and the Chinese Wildlife Conservation Association, the deal to lease the pandas involved political and diplomatic negotiations at the very highest level.

Costs and conservation
In addition to the extra staff they require, the pandas - which remain the property of China - cost $1m (E726,607, £609,998) per annum over the 10-year period. And that's before you factor in the estimated £70,000 ($114,754, E83,381) the zoo must fork out each year for the pandas' 18,000kg of specially-grown bamboo. What's more, any cubs produced by the pair would be returned to China after two years. So why did the zoo go to all that trouble?

Apart from it being something of a coup (Britain’s last resident pandas, Ming Ming and Bao Bao, left London Zoo in 1994) the gains – according to the RZSS – were seen as both conservational and financial.

The zoo’s director of giant pandas, Iain Valentine, says: “RZSS sought to include giant pandas as part of their collection for a variety of reasons. Primarily as pandas are seriously endangered and we believe Scotland’s expertise in animal nutrition, genetics, embryology, immunology and veterinary medicine could add to the overarching conservation programme, but also as they are a flagship species to highlight other conservation work.

“The commercial benefits were obviously part of the picture too.” He says visitor numbers spiked by 50 per cent in the first year of the pandas’ residency, covering the costs of the lease fee.

Media attention, public affection
Traditionally, zoos that lease pandas expect to see a drop-off in visitors by the end of the second year when the initial excitement has ebbed away, but Valentine says that Edinburgh Zoo has evaded this, with its pair of pandas receiving their one millionth visit in December 2013 – two years after they first arrived. “Our business model regarding giant pandas has always been extremely conservative. To date we’ve not seen any tail off in interest and we’ve bucked the trend for a panda zoo in year two,” he says.

“Realistically there’ll be a reduction in visitor levels at some point, however no zoo that has ever had giant pandas in recent years have ever returned them – all have extended their agreements.”

Of course, the biggest boon for generating visits and publicity is the birth of a panda cub. At 1/900th of their mother’s size – one of the smallest ratios for a newborn mammal – panda cubs are appealing to visitors and newspaper editors alike, driving up gate receipts and earning huge amounts of publicity.

The media went into minor frenzy last summer after speculation that Edinburgh’s Tian Tian might be pregnant. However, in the end it’s suspected she may have miscarried.

In the absence of nature’s miracles, zoos have been forced to explore innovative showcasing methods to maintain the panda buzz. Toronto Zoo became the world’s latest recipient of cubs when it welcomed Er Shun and Da Mao in March 2013 and the centre has sought to heighten public interaction with the cuddly creatures by creating its Giant Panda Experience exhibit.

Panda interpretation
The centre offers conservation and educational features designed for adults and children, using a variety of graphics and model displays, as well as interactive features, multi-media games and audio-visual presentations.

One element particularly popular with visitors is the food display, which shows the amount of bamboo each panda eats in a day and also “panda poop” to illustrate the output of the bamboo. “At 8,000 sq ft (745 sq m), the Panda Interpretive Centre, is one of the largest panda educational facilities in the world,” says Toronto Zoo’s chief operating officer Robin Hale.

“The centre employs many state-of-the-art interactive features to convey the importance of habitat preservation for the protection and survival of many threatened and endangered wild species, not just the giant panda.”

Toronto Zoo’s approach appears to have paid off. Recent attendance figures show a year-on-year increase of 31 per cent for the five months since the exhibit opened, and the zoo says it’s ahead of budget on revenue projections.

So far it seems, the pandas are earning their keep, which is just as well when you consider their bamboo, specially flown in from a plantation in Memphis, comes to $200,000 (E145,000, £122,000) a year.

But as Hale states, it’s not just about the money. “We’ve always placed environmental protection awareness at the heart of our mission and giant pandas are global ambassadors for species survival and protection,” he says. “A key objective of the 21st century is to show people the connection between wildlife survival and protection and sustainable human development.”

Beijing benefits
The practice of obtaining pandas from China - the only country in the world to have them - is not new. Known as panda diplomacy, its growth in popularity has both aided and mirrored Beijing’s march towards superpower status.

Originating in the 1950s as a brainwave of Chairman Mao’s for opening up diplomatic channels, the gifting of pandas to foreign nations proved so popular that China gave 23 pandas to nine different countries from 1958 to 1982.

But since the mid-1980s, China has stopped giving away pandas for free, instead leasing them for around $1m (E727,000, £610,000) per year over what is typically a decade-long contract. But despite the price hike, the western public’s love of pandas remains undiminished, helped perhaps by their indelible position in the culture.

Ever since the WWF chose the panda as its logo in 1961, the bear has come to represent one of the most treasured and mysterious creatures of nature, while modern movies like box office hit Kung Fu Panda have attracted a whole new generation of fans.

Weighing up costs
But despite optimistic figures coming from Edinburgh and Toronto, Dave Towne, president of the Giant Panda Conservation Foundation for North America, insists leasing a panda is more a labour of love than a calculated business decision. “I spend most of my time discouraging various institutions from trying to go after pandas, unless they have a really strong commitment and a large cheque book,” he says, pointing out that zoos face additional costs for extra staff, feeding and entertaining Chinese visitors, as well as having to fund further research and projects.

“It’s being used effectively by China. As I’ve told a lot of elected officials in US cities - you’ve got to be brave as it’s a long commitment that will require $15-30m (E10.9-21.8m £9.1-18.2m).”

China’s use of panda diplomacy has drawn scrutiny in recent years. In a research paper published in Environmental Practice journal in September 2013, a team from Oxford suggest that since 2008, panda loans have come about at the same time China has been signing trade deals for valuable resources and technology.

The researchers claimed that panda loans made to Canada, France and Australia coincided with trade deals for uranium, while reporting that the Edinburgh panda exchange was closely followed by an estimated £2.6bn ($4bn, E3.1bn) worth of contracts between China and Scotland for the supply of salmon, renewable energy technology and Land Rover vehicles.

“No doubt it’s [panda diplomacy] about trade,” says Towne. “The Canadian loan came about after Prime Minister Stephen Harper's trade visit to China. Beijing wants a relationship with Canada because of its coal and oil supplies”

Panda protection
With China’s panda populations on an upward spike – the last WWF survey in 2004 estimated there were 1,600 pandas in the wild, and this number is since thought to have grown – leasing solely for the sake of conservation objectives now seems less plausible.

Despite attracting criticism from wildlife groups who say panda diplomacy is cruel and unnecessary, the benefits for China’s wild and captive panda populations appear to be evident.

Under wildlife treaties and the lease agreements, all of the money paid to China for the pandas is reinvested in conservation projects across the country’s north where the bears primarily reside. China gained huge media attention in September 2013 when it showcased 14 panda cubs artificially bred at Chengdu Giant Panda Breeding and Research Base, hailed as a major breakthrough.

“It’s amazing to see the amount of work that goes into preserving the pandas,” says Xiaoping Lu, division director at the CITES management authority in China. “The exchange of people between China and the US has helped towards knowledge sharing, leading to key developments in technical assistance, breeding technology and nutrition management.”

As for the pandas travelling overseas, Lu insists that no pandas are ever taken from the wild and that bears are carefully selected from the country’s estimated 300-strong population in captivity.

The notoriously secretive mating habits of the panda has led to perceptions of it being a fragile creature which is highly vulnerable to change, but this is actually a misconception.

Pandas living in captivity abroad often live to be around 30-years-old – far longer than their life expectancy in the wild, which is estimated by experts to be around 20 years.

“Pandas are very adjustable animals and the most resilient of any I’ve dealt with,” says Towne. “The care afforded to these loaned pandas is very extensive, both medically and nutritionally. They're well looked after and only two per cent die prematurely in captivity now, which is pretty incredible.”

Regardless of whether panda leasing is seen as a costly loss-leader, an investment or a huge revenue generator for the attractions, the success of conservation efforts and huge appetite for these creatures among visitors, means that successful panda diplomacy is likely to continue well into the future.


Flying Pandas - By FEDEX
The high-profile nature of modern panda leasing has turned the practice into big business - best exemplified by the fact that transporter Fedex now offers a panda express service to fly bears around the world.

Having flown polar bears, white tigers, elephants, a rhinoceros, lions, gorillas and a 13ft (4m) tiger shark, Fedex set up its panda express in 2000 and has so far carried 12 pandas across the globe.

The nine-hour flight to Edinburgh in 2011 required 21 months of co-ordination between three teams of specialists in three countries. With custom-made Plexiglas enclosures, a dedicated team of four experts on board plus copious amounts of bamboo and mineral water, the pandas received VIP care during the 5,000 mile flight from Chengdu.

While FedEx inevitably benefits from the exposure of these major media events, its managing director of UK & Ireland ground operations Trevor Hoyle is keen to point out: “FedEx Express does not charge for transporting the pandas. We feel honoured to be called upon to ensure safe passage, thus indirectly helping with the efforts to save the endangered species.”

Panda particulars

* Giant Pandas have a black and white coat, with black eye patches and ears which make them very distinctive. Adults can grow to over 1.5m long and weigh up to 150kg

* Pandas often give birth to twins. In the wild, the mother will choose one cub to raise and leave the other to die. The discarded cub is raised by zoo staff in captivity

* Panda cubs grow up to 10 times their birth weight in the first five to six weeks

* Following ancient Chinese tradition, giant panda cubs are not to be named until they have been alive for 100 days

* A giant panda can eat up to 38kg of bamboo a day and will only select the best bamboo, rejecting as much as 85 per cent of it. This can take up to 16 hours to eat each day

* The giant panda’s teeth are approximately seven times bigger than a human’s, which helps the animal chew and eat its mountains of bamboo

Source: Edinburgh Zoo, Toronto Zoo, BBC

 



Panda particulars
Although bamboo for Er Shun and Da Mao costs $200k per year, Toronto Zoo’s visitor figures have increased 30 per cent year on year
Visitors to Edinburgh Zoo spiked by 50 per cent in the first year that the pandas became residents, and interest remains high
Toronto Zoo’s Panda interpretive Centre is one of the largest panda educational sites in the world and offers many interactive exhibits
Toronto Zoo’s Panda interpretive Centre is one of the largest panda educational sites in the world and offers many interactive exhibits
Edinburgh Zoo’s Yang Guang and Tian Tian have raised the profile of the attraction
LATEST NEWS
Eden Project targets 2020 start on geothermal energy project
A long-planned project to drill for geothermal heat to power the Eden Project site in Cornwall will finally go ahead, after EU and Cornwall Council funding was approved.
Alton Towers announces new attraction based on David Walliams' books
David Walliams, the comedian, actor and best-selling author, is partnering with the UK's Alton Towers Resort to bring characters from his children's books to life at the park in a new attraction: The World of David Walliams.
UK government invests £250m into cultural and creative infrastructure projects
Funding support for York's National Railway Museum, Coventry's 2021 UK City of Culture programme and infrastructure and maintenance work at local and regional museums across the country are all included in the UK Government's proposed new Culture Investment Fund.
Blackpool Museum to evoke lively spirit of UK's seaside entertainment heritage
A £13m (US$16.8m, €15.1m) project to create a museum that celebrates Blackpool's role in the development of British popular culture is moving forward, following the award of a £4m (US$5.2m, €4.7m) grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund.
New Dream Cruises ship to have world's longest seaborne coaster
The world's longest rollercoaster at sea will be included in an on board theme park on Dream Cruises' new Global Dream ship, due to launch in early 2021.
Scott Carver Architects to renovate oldest theatre in New South Wales, Australia
The Victoria Theatre, the oldest in the Australian state of New South Wales, is to undergo a renovation led by Scott Carver Architects aimed at conserving its heritage features and reviving it as a venue for live performances.
State-of-the-art aquarium to open in Vietnam in early 2020
A new high-tech aquarium that developers claim will be a model for future aquarium projects is to open on Phu Quoc Island, Vietnam, in early 2020.
Universal reveals new details for Beijing resort, announces seven themed lands
Universal Studios' under-construction Beijing theme park and resort will feature seven immersive, themed lands, it has announced.
Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry has long-term future secured after US$125m donation
Billionaire hedge fund manager Kenneth C. Griffin is to have the Museum of Science and Industry (MSI) in Chicago named after him, following a donation of US$125m (€113.5m, £98.9m) from his charitable fund.
MoMA's $450m Diller Scofidio + Renfro renovation is unveiled
After a five-year, $450m (€409m, £356m) renovation project split over two phases, New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) reopens next week with 102,000sq ft (9,500sq m) of new gallery and public space.
Oregon Coast Aquarium to build marine rehabilitation centre in $18m renovation
The Oregon Coast Aquarium is raising a targeted $18.2m (€16.5m, £14.4m) to remodel its facilities, improve its learning experience and build a marine rehabilitation centre, with design work by Dangermond Keane Architecture and Walker Macy.
Swiss National Museum debuts exhibition in renovated west wing
An overview of Swiss craftsmanship dating back a thousand years of history has gone on display at the Swiss National Museum in Zurich, with the opening of a new exhibition in the building's newly renovated west wing.
+ More news   
 
COMPANY PROFILES
IDEATTACK

IDEATTACK is a full-service planning and design company with headquarters in Los Angeles. [more...]
WhiteWater

WhiteWater was born in 1980 to create places where families unite and make joyful lasting memories [more...]
DJW

David & Lynn Willrich started the Company over thirty years ago, from the Audio Visual Department [more...]
ProSlide Technology, Inc.

A former national ski team racer, ProSlide® CEO Rick Hunter’s goal has been to integrate the smoot [more...]
+ More profiles  
FEATURED SUPPLIER

Rebranded EAG International Expo set to become leading trade show for the international entertainment and attractions industry
The newly rebranded Entertainment, Attractions and Gaming International Expo (EAG) is set to become the entertainment industry’s leading and most comprehensive trade event. [more...]
VIDEO GALLERY

Polin Waterparks & Pool Systems - Experience the experience
Have you ever wondered how the fun is created? Polin Waterparks is a global market leader in the design, manufacture and installation of waterparks and water play attractions. Find out more...
More videos:
Online Print Made Easy! – instantprint
Trailer Pinocchio - A Modern Tale VR – Red Raion
Simworx - The power to move you… – Simworx
+ More videos  

CATALOGUE GALLERY
 

+ More catalogues  
DIRECTORY
+ More directory  
DIARY

29-31 Oct 2019

Mediterranean Resort & Hotel Real Estate Forum (MR&H)

Hilton Athens, Athens, Greece
18-22 Nov 2019

IAAPA Expo

Orange County Convention Center, Orlando, United States
+ More diary  
 


ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media, Portmill House, Portmill Lane,
Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 1DJ Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2019

ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT NEWS
ATTRACTIONS HANDBOOK
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS