Latest
issue
GET ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT
magazine
Yes! Send me the FREE digital edition of Attractions Management and the FREE weekly Attractions Management ezines and breaking news alerts!
Not right now, thanksclose this window
Get Attractions Management digital magazine FREE
Sign up here ▸
Jobs   News   Features   Products   Company profilesProfiles   Magazine   Handbook   Advertise    Subscribe  
People
Håkon Lund

It’s really important for the industry to be at the forefront of change


Norway’s largest theme park, Kongeparken, is investing heavily in solar energy, as it looks to power the park’s operations using more sustainable resources. According to Lund Gruppen owner Håkon Lund, the park plans to source a third of its energy needs from solar power by the end of 2023.

As part of its energy strategy, Kongeparken has installed 1,100 solar panels on its land, which are being used to generate power for the park’s operations, from popcorn stands and concessions to large rides.

The park’s Zierer Wave Swinger carousel, for example, will be operated entirely on solar energy – the first of its kind in the world.

“We’re very excited to unveil our Zierer Wave Swinger, which will operate on 100 per cent solar energy,” Lund said, when they announced the project, adding that the park will also focus on promoting the need for more sustainable energy strategies.

“To raise awareness about the importance of green energy in tourism, Kongeparken will establish an information centre showcasing the industry’s transition towards eco-friendly practices,” he said.

“This initiative will inform and inspire our guests to support sustainable travel.

First opened in 1986, Kongeparken was acquired by the Lund family in 1997. A family attraction targeting children aged three to 12 years, the park has more than 50 rides.

Here we speak to Lund about lobbying government, supporting small businesses, and the unexpected effect the pandemic had on the company’s approach to sustainability.

Why did you decide to invest in solar power?
For a long time, electricity has been dirt cheap in Norway. Last year, electricity prices skyrocketed. Instead of waiting to see how this would affect us as a company, we said, Okay, if we’re serious about our environmental footprint, we must also be serious about how we create energy. Even though we already have 100 per cent sustainable energy in Norway (from hydropower), we realised we could increase the production of sustainable energy and help the nation to export more green energy, and that would affect power prices for everyone.

Real estate is a big part of operating a theme park or attraction. We saw that we could activate our real estate in ways we hadn’t done before, utilising spaces that wouldn’t normally be used by putting solar panels on them. We didn’t get any support from the Norwegian government – there were no subsidies whatsoever – but as a family company that’s been in business since 1895, we saw this as a long-term play. We now think our payback time will be around eight to 10 years for the solar panels we’ve installed.

How is your approach to sustainability evolving?
I can divide our approach to sustainability into two; before COVID-19 and after COVID-19.

Before the pandemic it was all about recycling and energy consumption. During the pandemic, we came to the realisation that we could dramatically change our carbon footprint and create a win-win situation for us as owners and operators, for our guests and for the environment.

In Scandinavia we have very short seasons – we invest a lot for 100 days of operation. We’ve always worked on extending the season with Christmas and Halloween events, but during the pandemic it became evident that we had guests who wanted to spend longer in the park and experience more as part of their trip.

For us it became a new thing – encouraging guests to stay with us not for one day, but for two or three days. That has been a huge success – feedback has improved immensely and we’ve found that guests are happier staying longer, paying more and experiencing more. It helps reduce our environmental footprint – guests are just making one journey, rather than coming for multiple short trips. Also it really helps us as operators – if guests spend longer with us, it means more optimal and longer use of our venue and all of our infrastructure – restaurants, staff and so on – that would otherwise have been used for just part of the day. That was a real awakening for us.

What changes does the industry need to make?
It’s really important for IAAPA and the industry to ensure we’re not just reacting to new regulations, but that we’re at the forefront of change.

A good example is the EU regulation around using disposable cups and containers. That’s a huge challenge for us – attractions companies are big consumers of disposables. As an industry we need to help each other. Instead of scrambling to see what new regulation means, the bigger parks need to take time to publish White Papers with best practices, and we need to work closely with the EU and the UN on our sustainability goals.

Can you tell us about your lobbying work?
We’re lobbying the Norwegian government for support on behalf of the tourism industry, particularly for small tourism attractions. Take solar power as an example. In Norway, tourist attractions are in full swing during the summer, at a time when we have sun for 24 hours a day. It’s ironic that these companies have no support or grants for solar power, while farmers do. We’d like that to change.

We’re looking at how we can we support smaller operators to improve their sustainability.

Lund Gruppen’s Skånes Djurpark Resort in Sweden Credit: Photo: Lund Gruppen
Solar is used to generate power for the park’s operations Credit: Photo: Lund Gruppen
Guests are encouraged to come for longer stays, says Lund Credit: Photo: Lund Gruppen
Credit: Photo: Lund Gruppen
Lund Gruppen parks are visited by more than 2.5 million guests per year Credit: Photo: Lund Gruppen
1,100 solar panels have been installed on Kongeparken land Credit: Photo: Lund Gruppen
COMPANY PROFILES
Clip 'n Climb

Clip ‘n Climb currently offers facility owners and investors more than 40 colourful and unique Cha [more...]
Taylor Made Designs

Taylor Made Designs (TMD) has been supplying the Attractions, Holiday Park, Zoos and Theme Park mark [more...]
TechnoAlpin

TechnoAlpin is the world leader for snowmaking systems. Our product portfolio includes all different [more...]
Simworx Ltd

The company was initially established in 1997. Terry Monkton and Andrew Roberts are the key stakeh [more...]
+ More profiles  
CATALOGUE GALLERY
 

+ More catalogues  
DIRECTORY
+ More directory  
DIARY

 

03-05 Sep 2024

ASEAN Patio Pool Spa Expo

IMPACT Exhibition Center, Bangkok, Thailand
03-08 Sep 2024

Spa Peeps International Corporate Cruise

Cruise London, Amsterdam, Zeebrugge, United States
+ More diary  
LATEST ISSUES
+ View Magazine Archive

Attractions Management

2024 issue 2


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Management

2024 issue 1


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Management

2023 issue 4


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Management

2023 issue 3


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Management News

06 Apr 2020 issue 153


View on turning pages
Download PDF
View archive
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription

Attractions Handbook

2019


View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
FREE digital subscription
Print subscription
 
ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
 
ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT
ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT NEWS
ATTRACTIONS HANDBOOK
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS
ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media
Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2024
Get Attractions Management digital magazine FREE
Sign up here ▸
Jobs    News   Products   Magazine   Subscribe
People
Håkon Lund

It’s really important for the industry to be at the forefront of change


Norway’s largest theme park, Kongeparken, is investing heavily in solar energy, as it looks to power the park’s operations using more sustainable resources. According to Lund Gruppen owner Håkon Lund, the park plans to source a third of its energy needs from solar power by the end of 2023.

As part of its energy strategy, Kongeparken has installed 1,100 solar panels on its land, which are being used to generate power for the park’s operations, from popcorn stands and concessions to large rides.

The park’s Zierer Wave Swinger carousel, for example, will be operated entirely on solar energy – the first of its kind in the world.

“We’re very excited to unveil our Zierer Wave Swinger, which will operate on 100 per cent solar energy,” Lund said, when they announced the project, adding that the park will also focus on promoting the need for more sustainable energy strategies.

“To raise awareness about the importance of green energy in tourism, Kongeparken will establish an information centre showcasing the industry’s transition towards eco-friendly practices,” he said.

“This initiative will inform and inspire our guests to support sustainable travel.

First opened in 1986, Kongeparken was acquired by the Lund family in 1997. A family attraction targeting children aged three to 12 years, the park has more than 50 rides.

Here we speak to Lund about lobbying government, supporting small businesses, and the unexpected effect the pandemic had on the company’s approach to sustainability.

Why did you decide to invest in solar power?
For a long time, electricity has been dirt cheap in Norway. Last year, electricity prices skyrocketed. Instead of waiting to see how this would affect us as a company, we said, Okay, if we’re serious about our environmental footprint, we must also be serious about how we create energy. Even though we already have 100 per cent sustainable energy in Norway (from hydropower), we realised we could increase the production of sustainable energy and help the nation to export more green energy, and that would affect power prices for everyone.

Real estate is a big part of operating a theme park or attraction. We saw that we could activate our real estate in ways we hadn’t done before, utilising spaces that wouldn’t normally be used by putting solar panels on them. We didn’t get any support from the Norwegian government – there were no subsidies whatsoever – but as a family company that’s been in business since 1895, we saw this as a long-term play. We now think our payback time will be around eight to 10 years for the solar panels we’ve installed.

How is your approach to sustainability evolving?
I can divide our approach to sustainability into two; before COVID-19 and after COVID-19.

Before the pandemic it was all about recycling and energy consumption. During the pandemic, we came to the realisation that we could dramatically change our carbon footprint and create a win-win situation for us as owners and operators, for our guests and for the environment.

In Scandinavia we have very short seasons – we invest a lot for 100 days of operation. We’ve always worked on extending the season with Christmas and Halloween events, but during the pandemic it became evident that we had guests who wanted to spend longer in the park and experience more as part of their trip.

For us it became a new thing – encouraging guests to stay with us not for one day, but for two or three days. That has been a huge success – feedback has improved immensely and we’ve found that guests are happier staying longer, paying more and experiencing more. It helps reduce our environmental footprint – guests are just making one journey, rather than coming for multiple short trips. Also it really helps us as operators – if guests spend longer with us, it means more optimal and longer use of our venue and all of our infrastructure – restaurants, staff and so on – that would otherwise have been used for just part of the day. That was a real awakening for us.

What changes does the industry need to make?
It’s really important for IAAPA and the industry to ensure we’re not just reacting to new regulations, but that we’re at the forefront of change.

A good example is the EU regulation around using disposable cups and containers. That’s a huge challenge for us – attractions companies are big consumers of disposables. As an industry we need to help each other. Instead of scrambling to see what new regulation means, the bigger parks need to take time to publish White Papers with best practices, and we need to work closely with the EU and the UN on our sustainability goals.

Can you tell us about your lobbying work?
We’re lobbying the Norwegian government for support on behalf of the tourism industry, particularly for small tourism attractions. Take solar power as an example. In Norway, tourist attractions are in full swing during the summer, at a time when we have sun for 24 hours a day. It’s ironic that these companies have no support or grants for solar power, while farmers do. We’d like that to change.

We’re looking at how we can we support smaller operators to improve their sustainability.

Lund Gruppen’s Skånes Djurpark Resort in Sweden Credit: Photo: Lund Gruppen
Solar is used to generate power for the park’s operations Credit: Photo: Lund Gruppen
Guests are encouraged to come for longer stays, says Lund Credit: Photo: Lund Gruppen
Credit: Photo: Lund Gruppen
Lund Gruppen parks are visited by more than 2.5 million guests per year Credit: Photo: Lund Gruppen
1,100 solar panels have been installed on Kongeparken land Credit: Photo: Lund Gruppen
LATEST NEWS
Excurio and The Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle create evolutionary VR experience
Virtual reality creators Excurio has teamed up with experts from The Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle to create Life Chronicles London, a free-roaming VR experience.
The Park Playground opens first immersive VR franchise in Porto
The Park Playground, has opened its first Immersive VR franchise in Porto, Portugal.
Bridgerton Season three – most Instagrammed locations
Following the release of season three Of Bridgerton, a study reveals its ten most Instagrammable filming locations.
Getty Museum refuses to surrender prized Greek bronze to Italy
The European Court of Human Rights has recognised Italy’s claim to a prized Greek antiquity.
Merlin unveils record-breaking Hyperia coaster at Thorpe Park
Merlin Entertainments has launched its new Hyperia rollercoaster at Thorpe Park to celebrate its 45th year.
Second Chaos Karts launches in Dubai
Live action video game experience Chaos Karts has launched in a 15,000sq ft arena in Al Quoz, Dubai.
Vietnam Van Gogh exhibition uses VIOSO-powered immersive installations
Twenty-five cameras, nine servers, 70 projectors and a range of AV technologies are being used to bring the art of Van Gogh to life in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
Use of cinematography techniques significantly increases engagement with VR
A study has found that the use of cinematic and video editing techniques can drastically increase the aesthetic appeal and user engagement of virtual reality environments.
Disneyland Paris renames theme park as part of $2 billion transformation
Disneyland Paris has unveiled a new name for Walt Disney Studios Park as part of the park’s US$2 billion transformation.
UK's Royal attractions had a bumper year in 2023
Numbers from the Association of Leading Visitor Attractions, (ALVA) show that Royal attractions saw a huge increase in visitor numbers during 2023 – the coronation year of King Charles III.
Efteling to convert steam trains to electric as part of green drive
The Everyday Heritage initiative celebrates and preserves working class histories
Off the back of the success of the first round of Everyday Heritage Grants in 2022, Historic England is funding 56 creative projects that honour the heritage of working-class England.
+ More news   
 
COMPANY PROFILES
Clip 'n Climb

Clip ‘n Climb currently offers facility owners and investors more than 40 colourful and unique Cha [more...]
Taylor Made Designs

Taylor Made Designs (TMD) has been supplying the Attractions, Holiday Park, Zoos and Theme Park mark [more...]
TechnoAlpin

TechnoAlpin is the world leader for snowmaking systems. Our product portfolio includes all different [more...]
Simworx Ltd

The company was initially established in 1997. Terry Monkton and Andrew Roberts are the key stakeh [more...]
+ More profiles  
CATALOGUE GALLERY
+ More catalogues  
DIRECTORY
+ More directory  
DIARY

 

03-05 Sep 2024

ASEAN Patio Pool Spa Expo

IMPACT Exhibition Center, Bangkok, Thailand
03-08 Sep 2024

Spa Peeps International Corporate Cruise

Cruise London, Amsterdam, Zeebrugge, United States
+ More diary  
 


ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media
Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2024

ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT NEWS
ATTRACTIONS HANDBOOK
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS